Jumbo Content

Project Scientist Comments on New NASA Timelapse


In this video, PACE Project Scientist Dr. Jeremy Werdell comments on the new time-lapse of life on our entire planet over the last two decades, and discusses how NASA data are being used to study the health of ocean ecosystems.
Click image to view movie. Credit: NASA/GSFC
[17-Nov-17] NASA scientists now have the most complete global picture of life on Earth to date. From the unique vantage point of space, NASA observes not only Earth's landmasses and oceans but also the organisms that live among them. We see the entire Earth breathing, growing and changing.

A true understanding of our planet requires us to keep a keen eye on its living inhabitants. With NASA's fleet of Earth-observing satellites, scientists can track worldwide changes in vegetation, marine life, human development and more. We've seen fisheries evolving, deserts expanding, spring coming earlier and fall coming later. Seeing these kinds of changes occur all over the world has taught us a lot about the ingredients for life and the environmental conditions that can sustain it.

In this video, PACE Project Scientist Dr. Jeremy Werdell comments on the new time-lapse of life on our entire planet over the last two decades, and discusses how NASA data are being used to study the health of ocean ecosystems.