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Science and Applications Team

PACE will make climate-quality global measurements that are essential for understanding ocean biology, biogeochemistry, ecology, aerosols, and cloud properties. Its data will be used to determine the role of the ocean and atmosphere in global biogeochemical cycling, ocean ecology, and how perturbations to Earth's energy balance affect – and are affected by – climate change.

With advanced global remote sensing capabilities PACE is expected to provide high-quality observations that will contribute substantially to basic research and applications and extend the current time series of climate-relevant data to enable detection of long-term trends.

Science and Applications Leadership

Heidi Dierssen
Lorraine Remer
Lorraine Remer
University of Maryland Baltimore County
PACE Deputy Science and Applications Team Lead
Unified Algorithm for Aerosol Characterization from OCI on PACE 19-PACESAT19-0014

Science and Applications Team

Brian Barnes
Emmanuel Boss
Emmanuel Boss
University of Maine
Radiative Products for the PACE Era
Jacek Chowdhary
Jacek Chowdhary
Columbia University and NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
PACE UV Retrieval of Ocean and Atmosphere Data-Products (PACE UV ROAD): CDM, BrC and BC Polarimetry
Peter Gaube
Chuanmin Hu
Chuanmin Hu
University of South Florida
Deciphering Sargassum Physics, Biology, and Physiology through PACE Measurements: Implications to Ocean Ecology, Biogeochemistry, and Management Decision Support
K. Fred Huemmrich
K. Fred Huemmrich
University of Maryland Baltimore County
Terrestrial Ecology Products from PACE
Nick Krotkov
Nick Krotkov
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Hyperspectral Algorithms for PACE OCI Water Leaving Reflectances and UV Penetration Depths
Alexei Lyapustin
Alexei Lyapustin
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
MAIAC Processing of OCI Over Land: High Resolution Aerosol Retrievals and Atmospheric Correction
Kerry Meyer
Kerry Meyer
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Cloud Products from the PACE Ocean Color Imager
Daniel Odermatt
Daniel Odermatt
Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
Hyperspectral Retrieval of Stratification in Aquatic Systems (HyperStrata)
Matteo Ottaviani
Matteo Ottaviani
Terra Research Inc / NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface Refractive Index and Oil Spill Detection for the PACE Mission
Nima Pahlevan
Nima Pahlevan
Science Systems and Applications Inc. (SSAI)
Maximizing Utility of PACE in Coastal and Major Freshwater Ecosystems: Advancing Science for Societal Benefits
Cecile Rousseaux
Robert Shuchman
Robert Shuchman
Michigan Tech Research Institute
Developing a PACE Hyperspectral Bio-Optical Algorithm Framework for Detection of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms
David Siegel
David Siegel
UC Santa Barbara
Development of Robust Spectral Derivative Algorithms for Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations on Local to Global Scales
Snorre Stamnes
Snorre Stamnes
NASA Langley Research Center
The PACE-MAPP Algorithm: Coupled Aerosol and Ocean Products from Combined Polarimeter and OCI SWIR Measurements
Dariusz Stramski
Dariusz Stramski
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego
Next Generation Algorithms Based on PACE Capabilities to Obtain Inherent Optical Properties of Seawater Associated with Phytoplankton, Nonalgal Particles, and Colored Dissolved Organic Matter
Michael Twardowski
Michael Twardowski
Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute / Florida Atlantic University
A New Semi-Analytical Ocean Color Model and Inversion Algorithm for PACE
Bastiaan van Diedenhoven
Bastiaan van Diedenhoven
Columbia University
Remote Sensing of Cloud Properties using PACE SPEXone and HARP-2
Toby Westberry
Toby Westberry
Oregon State University
A Net Primary Production Algorithm for Application to PACE
Pengwang Zhai
Xiaodong Zhang
Xiaodong Zhang
University of Southern Mississippi
Using Multi-Angle Polarimetry to Derive Χ Factor and Improve BRDF Correction for PACE's OCI
About Us
The selected Science and Applications Team (SAT) is a diverse group of investigators who cumulatively bring end-to-end knowledge of different aspects of the breadth of basic and applied research and applications possible from the PACE observatory, as well as the scientific, algorithm, and modeling approaches of measurements and data products needed to address the science questions of the mission.
Science Meetings
The first meeting of the PACE Science and Applications Team (SAT) was held online in June 2020. The meeting opened with several presentations about the PACE Project, including details about the Ocean Color Instrument and polarimeters. Each SAT member gave a brief overview of his or her research and then fielded questions from the audience. MORE
The fourth meeting of the PACE Science Team was held at the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in January of 2018. The meeting consisted of a virtual, self-paced segment in which science team members prepared and viewed narrated versions of their presentations in preparation for the meeting, followed by an in-person meeting. The first day focused on the PACE Science Team deliverables and plans for the polarimeters. The second day focused on engineering challenge of PACE as well as the results from Cal/Val concepts. On the final day, subgroups reported on their activities. For many of the presentations, both a narrated video and a PDF of the talk is available. MORE
The third meeting of the PACE Science Team (ST) was held during mid-January 2017 at the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Florida, USA. The meeting consisted of a virtual, self-paced segment in which science team members prepared and viewed narrated versions of their presentations in preparation for the meeting, followed by an in-person meeting. Science Team members formed break-out groups to discuss the status of major project areas, including the retrieval of inherent optical properties (IOP) and atmospheric corrections (AC). Field campaign results and potential applications for PACE measurements were reviewed. MORE
The second meeting of the PACE Science Team (ST) was held during mid-January 2016 in Pasadena, CA. Threshold Requirements for the PACE Mission, minimum capabilities for the polarimeter, and instrument trade study results were shared. An overview of the mission and top-level schedule were presented along with science implementation priorities. ST presentations fell in to the general categories of applications, science impacts related to the designs of the Ocean Color Instrument and other sensors, retrieval of inherent optical properties and atmospheric correction. The meeting concluded with reports from ST subgroups and plans for future PACE ST documents. MORE
The first face-to-face meeting of the PACE Science Team (ST) was held during mid-January 2015 in College Park, MD. The opening discussion covered approaches for defining the project elements (i.e., science, data processing and analysis, post-launch calibration/validation; procurement of spacecraft and polarimeter) within the mission cost cap. After reviewing recommendations of the PACE Science Definition Team, ST presentations fell under the general themes of atmospheric correction, inherent optical properties, and applied sciences. The meeting concluded by setting ST goals and a work plan for the subsequent year. MORE
In mid-March 2012, the PACE Science Definition Team (SDT) held its second community workshop in Arlington, VA. In addition to reviewing outcomes from the previous meeting (Nov 2011), the outline and schedule for the SDT report was addressed. Information exchanges between the SDT and PACE Engineering Team were a key focus of the meeting. In addition, disciplinary groups (oceans, atmosphere) discussed relevant sections of the SDT report, including reviews of completeness and science traceability. The workshop concluded with formalizing and assigning action items needed for the final SDT report (which was completed in October 2012). MORE
In 2011, NASA selected the PACE science definition team (SDT) via an open solicitation. Composed of ocean, aerosol, and cloud scientists, the SDT held its first open community workshop in Arlington, VA. The team was tasked with providing science input to the NASA's PACE mission study (ocean biology/ecology/chemistry and clouds/aerosols) and CNES's polarimeter instrument study. The SDT was charged with defining the science content of the mission and working closely with the engineering team to define (a) mission concept(s) that optimizes science, cost, and risk. They are also responsible for defining and defending the science value of the mission concept(s). MORE
Other Key Meetings
The session,"Frontiers in Ocean Color Remote Sensing: Science and Challenges," was held during the Ocean Sciences Meeting (26-Feb-16). Advanced technologies and frequent, repeated, multi-scale satellite observations, in combination with field measurements, are essential for observing and predicting changes in Earth's ocean. Presentations explored the next generation of ocean science questions from ocean-observing satellites and challenges to those observations from science, technology, and modeling perspectives. MORE
The Ocean Color Research Team (OCRT) meeting was held on May 2-4 in Silver Spring, MD. The meeting featured both oral presentations and posters, which included content on currently-operating missions, upcoming solicitations, the PACE mission, and the upcoming Decadal Survey. MORE
The NASA PACE project, in collaboration with the International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG), have initiated a new working group to establish standard, community-consensus field protocols for measuring aquatic primary productivity in coastal and ocean waters across diverse methodologies. Approximately two dozen active investigators with experience in conducting field, laboratory, and remote sensing measurements of aquatic primary productivity will work jointly in the development of a set of community consensus protocols for carrying out in situ measurements of primary productivity and related parameters. The objective is to generate recommendations for best practices to homogenize methodologies, and to account for known artifacts and sources of error across the various measurement approaches. MORE
PACE Science Team by Topic
[Click on the slideshow to see science team members and the properties they’re studying]
PACE Science Accomplishments and Consensus Documents