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A diagram describing the mission architecture for PACE. Credit: NASA/PACE
[12-Feb-20] PACE Mission Architecture
Hyperspectral measurements collected from orbit over <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bermuda/@32.3192793,-64.8366121,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x8a2d139e8668b0a5:0x3cdffdc72c99b8bc!8m2!3d32.3078!4d-64.7505">Bermuda</a> on August 17, 2013. The animation cycles through 128 channels - three at a time. The sliders on the right show which channels (represented by their central wavelength in nanometers) were used for the red, green, and blue components of each frame of the animation. Credit: Norman Kuring (NASA)
[09-Apr-19] The Coastal Ocean from a Hyperspectral Perspective
This animation depicts the colors we see (left) vs the colors PACE will see (right) as it loops through the wavelengths between 366 and 2247 nm. Credit: Andy Sayer (NASA)
[09-Apr-19] Colors PACE Will See
An overview of the PACE Mission provided by Jeremy Werdell, Project Scientist. Credit: NASA GSFC
[25-Mar-19] PACE Overview
This rendering shows a model of the PACE spacecraft as it orbits Earth. Credit: NASA GSFC
[05-Mar-19] PACE Spacecraft In Orbit Over Earth
A digital rendering shows the instruments and associated equipment that will be included on board the PACE spacecraft. Credit: NASA GSFC
[04-Mar-19] Beauty Shot of PACE Spacecraft
A digital rendering of the Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosytem (PACE) spacecraft on a black background. Credit: NASA GSFC
[03-Mar-19] Rendering of the PACE Spacecraft
A digital rendering of the Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosytem (PACE) spacecraft on a grey background. Credit: NASA GSFC
[02-Mar-19] Rendering of the PACE Spacecraft
A rendering of the PACE spacecraft, as seen from afar, produced by the NASA Scientific Visualization Studio. Credit: NASA GSFC
[01-Mar-19] PACE Spacecraft Approach
Depiction of how ocean color, clouds and aerosols information will be collected by the PACE satellite. In-water and airborne instruments will be employed to validate PACE data. Calibration of satellite sensors will involve using the Sun, moon, and ocean buoys as reference sources. Credit: NASA GSFC
[10-May-18] PACE Data Collection Overview
A view of the HyperSAS radiometer in the bow during rough seas. The lenses of the radiometer must be cleaned periodically because of sea spray. Credit: Kirsten Carlson (SOI)
[10-May-18] A Wild Ride
Scientists will use several instruments and tools to gather and measure optical and biogeochemical particle data. Some will use light to measure qualities such as backscatter. Others will physically collect or filter water. Remote-sensing data will also be gathered. Credit: NASA GSFC
[10-May-18] Instruments and Tools
Joel Scott, scientific programmer (left), and Gary Davis, spacecraft systems engineer (right), showcase cultures of phytoplankton for NASA Earth Day Celebration at Union Station in Washington D.C. Credit: NASA GSFC
[19-Apr-18] Phytoplankton at Earth Day
Visitors at the NASA Earth Day Celebration at Union Station (Washington D.C.) check out water with different optical properties while learning about PACE ocean color measurements. Credit: NASA GSFC
[19-Apr-18] Taking a Closer Look at Ocean Color
A view of the exhibits at the NASA Earth Day event on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at Union Station in Washington, D.C. Credit: Aubrey Gemignani (NASA)
[19-Apr-18] NASA Earth Day at Union Station
A visitor gives a high five after learning about phytoplankton at the PACE table at the Earth Day event at Union Station in Washington, D.C. Credit: Aubrey Gemignani (NASA)
[19-Apr-18] High Five for Phytoplankton
A family checks out a vial containing a culture of <em>Emiliana huxleyi</em>, a phytoplankton that plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. Credit: Aubrey Gemignani (NASA)
[19-Apr-18] Meeting Phytoplankton
Dr. Jeremy Werdell, PACE Project Scientist, presents a hyperwall talk at the 2018 NASA Earth Day event at Union Station in Washington D.C. Credit: NASA PACE
[19-Apr-18] Satellites, Ships and Shoes
PACE Project Scientist Dr. Jeremy Werdell concludes a hyperwall talk that he presented for a public audience at the NASA Earth Day event in Washington, D.C. Credit: NASA PACE
[19-Apr-18] PACE Hyperwall Talk
The Spectro-Polarimeter for Planetary Exploration (SPEXone), pictured here, is one of two polarimeters planned for inclusion on PACE. SPEXone will be provided by the Netherlands and will be used primarily for the characterization of aerosols. Credit: © Airbus Defence and Space Netherlands & SRON Netherlands Institute
[12-Mar-18] SPEXone Polarimeter
The Hyper Angular Rainbow Polarimeter (HARP-2) is one of two polarimeters on the PACE mission. HARP-2 (provided by the University of Maryland Baltimore County) will be used to determine cloud droplet size, ice particle shape and roughness. Credit: NASA
[12-Mar-18] HARP-2 Polarimeter
An annotated diagram of the PACE spacecraft and instruments, including the two polarimeters, HARP-2 and SPEXone. The primary instrument, the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) is located at top right and is depicted in silver. Credit: NASA GSFC
[12-Mar-18] PACE Instruments
The Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) is a highly advanced optical spectrometer and the primary sensor on PACE. Credit: NASA GSFC
[12-Mar-18] Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) Diagram
Members of the PACE Science Team pose for a photo at the 2018 Science Team Meeting, held at the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, FL. Credit: PACE Mission
[20-Feb-18] PACE Science Team
A graphic rendering of the PACE Observatory, with solar panels deployed. Credit: NASA GSFC
[13-Feb-18] PACE Observatory (1 of 2)
A graphic rendering of the PACE Observatory, with solar panels deployed. Credit: NASA GSFC
[13-Feb-18] PACE Observatory (2 of 2)
The PACE Observatory from above, with solar panels deployed. Credit: NASA GSFC
[13-Feb-18] PACE Observatory From Above (1 of 2)
The PACE Observatory from above, with solar panels deployed. Credit: NASA GSFC
[13-Feb-18] PACE Observatory From Above (2 of 2)
Jars of phytoplankton cultures show their unique coloration in a lineup at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Boothbay Maine. Credit: Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
[10-Nov-17] A Rainbow of Plankton
The PACE team at Goddard Space Flight Center - developing new ways to study life in the ocean. Credit: NASA
[22-Sep-17] The PACE team at Goddard Space Flight Center
An annotated diagram of the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) - the primary instrument for the PACE Mission. Credit: NASA PACE
[01-Aug-17] Ocean Color Instrument Annotated Diagram
An illustration of the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI). Credit: NASA PACE
[31-Jul-17] Ocean Color Instrument
PACE Project engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center work on the Focal Plane Assemblies for the main instrument and test an early development unit of the combined detector and front-end electronics. Credit: Ulrik Gliese (NASA GSFC)
[27-Jul-17] PACE Engineers Work on Focal Plane Assemblies
The team of engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center responsible for developing PACE instrument components. Credit: Ulrik Gliese (NASA GSFC)
[27-Jul-17] PACE Project Engineers
Diagram of the PACE observatory over Earth.
[10-Jul-17] PACE Observatory Diagram
Ocean color scientists Norman Kuring (left) and Lachlan McKinna (right) wade waist-deep into the Chesapeake Bay to measure the "Sneaker Depth" of the water - the depth where a pair of white sneakers can no longer be seen. Credit: NASA GSFC
[11-Jun-17] Ocean Color Scientists Participate in Wade In
Dr. Ivona Cetinić (right) shows participants at the annual sneaker depth measurement event information about ocean color. Credit: NASA GSFC
[11-Jun-17] Dr. Cetinić Explains Ocean Color
Ben Crooke (center), a 17-year-old NASA summer intern, helped derive Fowler’s Sneaker Depth. Crooke spent part of his summer analyzing Fowler’s data and satellite imagery to understand local trends in water clarity. Credit: NASA GSFC
[11-Jun-17] NASA Intern Leads the Way
Goddard oceanographer Lachlan McKinna speaks with Bernie Fowler, a retired state senator and creator of the "Sneaker Depth" measurement. Credit: NASA GSFC
[11-Jun-17] A 29-year Citizen Science Measurement Effort
Bernie Fowler leads a group of citizens and scientists into the Chesapeake Bay for an annual water quality measurement known as the "Sneaker Depth." Credit: NASA GSFC
[11-Jun-17] Fowler's Sneaker Depth Measurement
Illustration of the PACE observatory with solar panel (dark blue) deployed. In this perspective, the Ocean Color Instrument is located toward the bottom right. The S-band omni-directional command and telemetry antenna is pointing down (foreground). Credit: NASA PACE
[11-May-17] PACE Observatory Diagram (Deployed Solar Panel)
Illustration of the PACE Observatory with the solar panel stowed.
[11-May-17] PACE Observatory Diagram (Stowed Solar Panel)
PACE will be the first mission to provide measurements that enable prediction of the boom-bust of fisheries, the appearance of harmful algae, and other factors that affect commercial and recreational industries.
[10-May-17] PACE - Economy and Society
Shareable graphic created for AGU. Credit: NASA
[01-Dec-16] Shareable Graphic Created for AGU
Shareable graphic created for Key Decision Point - A. Credit: NASA GSFC
[08-Sep-16] Shareable Graphic Created for Key Decision Point - A
Aimee Neeley demos the "Little Bits" ocean color activity. Credit: Bryan Franz (NASA/GSFC)
[27-Jul-16] Ocean Color Demo at NASA Goddard’s Science Jamboree
A diagram of the optical bench tilts on the proposed PACE Ocean Color Instrument. Credit: Gerhard Meister (NASA GSFC)
[06-Jul-16] PACE OCI Optical Bench Tilts
The internal design of the PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI). The instrument is designed to include two hyperspectral and six SWIR channels. Credit: Gerhard Meister (NASA GSFC)
[06-Jul-16] PACE Optical System Concept Approach
Preliminary draft diagrammatic representation of the PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI).
[02-May-16] Draft Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) Diagram
Logo for the PACE mission, which will study Earth's ocean ecosystems and their relationship to airborne particles and clouds. Credit: NASA
[22-Feb-16] PACE Logo
An 18-year continuous record shows variation in average chlorophyll-a concentrations (about 0.15 milligrams per cubic meter) between 40°N and 40°S latitude. Credit: Figure updated from Franz et al., State of the Climate in 2014, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.
[02-Feb-16] Chlorophyll Time Series
NASA study shows diatom populations (phytoplankton) have declined more than 1% per year from 1998 to 2012. Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio
[24-Sep-15] NASA Study Shows a Decline in Populations of Diatoms in the World's Oceans
Comparison of PACE spectral coverage with heritage U.S. ocean color sensors.
[30-Jun-15] PACE Spectral Coverage Compared to Heritage Sensors
CALIPSO (foreground) and CloudSat (background) can be used to study the effects of clouds and aerosols on climate and weather. Credit: NASA
[09-Jan-07] CloudSat and CALIPSO
Image of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument. Credit: NASA
[08-Jan-07] VIIRS Instrument
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) launched in 2012 onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP).
[07-Jan-07] Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)
MODIS instrument launched aboard NASA's Aqua satellite in 2002.
[06-Jan-07] Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua
NASA's multi-instrument Terra satellite launched in 1999 carrying the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).
[05-Jan-07] Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra
SeaWiFS Instrument Credit: NASA
[05-Jan-07] SeaWiFS Instrument
The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) operated between 1997 and 2010, far exceeding its initial design of five years.
[04-Jan-07] Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS)
An example polar-orbiting satellite with AVHRR. Credit: NASA
[03-Jan-07] An Example Polar-orbiting Satellite with AVHRR
An image of Landsat-4, which was launched in 1982. Credit: NASA
[02-Jan-07] Landsat-4
SeaSat (left) only operated for 110 days but served as a proof of concept for several types of ocean sensors, including those that monitor winds, currents, and sea level. Nimbus-7 (right) included the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), which proved that ocean color could be measured from space.
[01-Jan-07] SeaSat and Nimbus-7